Books: Hands On Hacking

While I’ve been stuck at home as the global coronavirus pandemic rages on (currently on day 241 of quarantine, for those who listen to the Same Shade Of Difference), I’ve been trying to make the most of my time in captivity with lots of reading, training, and personal projects to learn as much new stuff as I can. One of the items that came on to my radar a few months ago was a new infosec book titled Hands On Hacking from Wiley. Written in part by Hacker Fantastic, who I’ve followed on Twitter for quite a few years across my various accounts, I figured it would be a good refresher for some of the hacking concepts I’ve used before and a primer for newer tooling that I’m not as familiar with.

As you can see from the book’s cover, the idea is to teach “purple teaming”, which is the idea of doing away with the silos for the “red team” that tries to breach systems and the “blue team” that tries to defend them. The book covers the full gamut of hacking, starting with open source information gathering to get as much data as you can about your target before actively engaging with any of their systems all the way through compromising web applications and moving laterally through internal systems.

All throughout, the book uses purple teaming as a focus; it very clearly outlines that taking part in any of the activities covered without the express consent of the owners of the system can carry severe legal penalties. The goal is to assist you with either a career as a penetration tester or to give you the tools and knowledge to be able to pen test and secure your own systems that you manage. You will not read the book and immediately find yourself living the life of a Mr. Robot character.

The book, in my opinion, is very well written. While I was familiar with most of the concepts covered, I think it was written in a way that makes the material approachable even for readers without much prior knowledge in the world of infosec. That being said, while there is a good bit of hand-holding in the introduction to Linux, I think there are some basic, assumed competencies in the world of computing. I don’t think that’s a fault; you really have to draw the line somewhere, and I think the authors did a fantastic job of making everything as approachable as possible.

The book comes with a complete lab environment with virtual machines pre-configured to be exploitable in a fashion to demonstrate the concepts covered in each chapter of the book, giving readers the option to either read the book purely for information or to work through the labs and practice executing the material discussed. In my mind it’s essentially like a self-guided, DIY version of something like the excellent Foundstone Ultimate Hacking class that I was fortunate enough to take a few years ago.

If you’re already a skilled hacker, is the book going to enlighten you to new, next-level exploits? Definitely not. But if you’re a systems administrator who is responsible for the managing servers at your company, a SaaS admin responsible for identities, or a developer responsible for creating applications exposed to the Internet at large, it’ll give you a very solid baseline for making sure that your own systems aren’t vulnerable to the most egregious of issues. I personally found the open source intelligence gathering chapter very useful; it covered techniques and services for determining the amount of information about your company and specific details regarding the employees that’s available to literally anyone with an interest in finding out more. It’s allowed me to work through setting up some scripts to automatically check on this and notify me when perhaps more information is leaking out than it should due to things like 3rd party breaches where users may have signed up with a company email address.

Similarly, I think the book is also a good read for leadership-level people who may not need to know the technical details of how hacks are accomplished but need to be mindful of what’s possible and what their employees should be looking for when developing and administering systems. These readers likely don’t need to go through things like achieving the exploits themselves in the lab (though obviously it’s cool if they want to), but the book can serve as a nice reference for what the company’s employees should be looking for when they decide to roll out a new service or application.